In a speech at a gay-advocacy fundraiser Sunday, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg defended his homosexuality in a remark aimed at vice president Mike Pence, a proponent of traditional marriage. Insisting that his homosexual behavior and legal marriage to another man do not contradict his beliefs as an Episcopalian Christian, Buttigieg said:

My marriage to Chasten has made me a better man and yes, Mr. Vice President, it has moved me closer to God . . . If me being gay was a choice, it was a choice that was made far, far above my pay grade. And that’s the thing I wish the Mike Pences of the world would understand—that if you’ve got a problem with who I am, your problem is not with me. Your quarrel, sir, is with my creator.

The claim that “God made me this way” is a common slogan heard from defenders of homosexuality. This high-minded claim seems to place the matter beyond further argument—for what Christian will say that God doesn’t make us who we are? And if he makes some people gay, then we should accept it.

Some Christians respond to this argument with what seems to be the only alternative: by saying that those who identify as gay choose to be gay. This response is usually met with so much derision—“With all the homophobia in the world, who would choose to be gay??”… “Did you choose to be straight??—that it’s seldom helpful to a conversation.

In one sense, of course, it’s completely true. If by gay you mean “a person who engages in homosexual behavior,” then God doesn’t make someone gay any more than he makessomeone an adulterer, a fornicator, or a man who has relations with just his wife. God doesn’t make people engage in any sexual behaviors. We freely choose all our moral actions—that’s why we can be held accountable for them.

Read more at Catholic Answers. 

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